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Prince William admits discrimination remains ‘all too familiar’ in Britain

Britain’s Prince William speaks during the unveiling of the National Windrush Monument at Waterloo Station in London, Britain June 22, 2022. REUTERS/John Sibley/Pool

Britain’s Prince William speaks during the unveiling of the National Windrush Monument at Waterloo Station in London, Britain June 22, 2022. REUTERS/John Sibley/Pool

Published Jun 22, 2022

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Prince William believes discrimination remains “an all too familiar experience” for black men and women in Britain.

The 40-year-old prince made the comment during a speech at Waterloo train station in London, where William and his wife, the Duchess of Cambridge, unveiled a new monument to celebrate the dreams and courage of the Windrush generation.

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He said: “Discrimination remains an all too familiar experience for black men and women in Britain in 2022.”

British Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities Michael Gove shakes hands with Britain's Prince William next to Windrush passenger Alford Gardner and Baroness Floella Benjamin during the unveiling of the National Windrush Monument at Waterloo Station in London, Britain June 22, 2022. REUTERS/John Sibley/Pool

The statue has been designed by the Jamaican artist and sculptor Basil Watson, and was unveiled by the royal couple as part of a series of engagements to mark Windrush Day (22 June, 22) in the UK. The monument features a depiction of a man, woman and child standing on top of their suitcases after arriving in the country.

Prince William spoke out against the Windrush Scandal - which involved the wrongful deportation of members of the Windrush generation - and he also conceded that real equality remains some way off.

He said: “Only a matter of years ago, tens of thousands of that generation were profoundly wronged by the Windrush Scandal. That rightly reverberates throughout the Caribbean community here in the UK as well as many in the Caribbean nations.

“Therefore, alongside celebrating the diverse fabric of our families, our communities and our society as a whole - something the Windrush Generation has contributed so much to - it is also important to acknowledge the ways in which the future they sought and deserved has yet to come to pass.”

Windrush Day was introduced in 2018 in the hope of encouraging communities across the UK to celebrate the contribution of the Windrush generation, who migrated to the country after World War II.

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Britain's Prince William and Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge accompanied by Baroness Floella Benjamin, Windrush passengers Alford Gardner and John Richards and children pose for a picture next to the National Windrush Monument at Waterloo Station in London, Britain June 22, 2022. REUTERS/John Sibley/Pool

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge also met young people from the the British-Caribbean community at Elevate, a non-profit organisation in London that brings together creativity and culture.

Elevate hopes to provide young people with the opportunities they need in order to forge successful careers within the creative industries.

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